Dinner plate dating

Posted by / 09-Oct-2020 10:27

Many dated examples between 19 exist, and occasional examples dated between 19 have also been noted although B.8 was more generally used in those years (with the words MADE IN ENGLAND at the bottom of the mark in place of the single word ENGLAND).

This mark is still used on fine earthenware products such as Character Jugs.

On smaller wares, only the bottom half of this mark (i.e. Although B.8 was generally used between 19 B.7 is occasionally found on wares made during these years.

the WEDGWOOD mark is found on useful wares between 17 and on all wares produced thereafter until the sans serif version of the mark was introduced in 1929It was in 1769 that he formed two partnerships, Wedgwood and Bentley produced decorative ware with his good friend, Thomas Bentley.Between 1878 (when Henry and James Doulton acquired the major interest in the Pinder, Bourne factory in Nile Street, Burslem) and 1882 (when the name of the firm was changed to Doulton & Company, Burslem) existing Pinder, Bourne marks continued in use, such as the name in full: PINDER BOURNE CO.: and the initials P. Introduced in the latter part of 1901 to mark the grant of the Royal Warrant by King Edward VII together with the specific right to use the word ROYAL to designate Doulton products. Several of these were adopted after 1882 by Doulton and remained in use for about twenty years. Occasionally found also between 19 along with B.7 but the later Holbein Wares were not always specifically marked.The first letter of the code represents the month of manufacture, the second identified the potter who threw the shape and the last letter signifying the year the piece was made starting with . From 1907 on in the third series the first letter for the month is replaced by a 3 and with the fourth series commencing with A in 1924 with the figure 4.There is an area of confusion in wares in the first two series.

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The coronet was probably added to the earlier mark c. The Prince of Wales' (later King Edward VI 1), ENGLAND was added underneath after 1891. It appears to have been used instead of B.3 especially on bone china products and on the more expensive earthen wares.